‘I Can’t Tell You How Painful This Is’: Family, Friends Remember Samantha Josephson

COLUMBIA, S.C. (CBS) – A life gone too soon. Friends and family gathered Sunday to remember 21-year-old Samantha Josephson.

The University of South Carolina student and New Jersey native was abducted and killed after getting into a car Friday that she thought was her Uber in Columbia, South Carolina’s 5 Points area.

Her father now has a warning to students and young people everywhere.

Be safer and act smarter.

“I can’t tell you how painful this is,” Seymour Josephson, her father, said.

Missing New Jersey College Student Found Dead In South Carolina Was Murdered, Police Say

Seymour Josephson pledged to honor his daughter’s memory by bringing pressure on rideshare services to increase safety standards.

“Samantha was by herself, she had absolutely no chance,” he said. “None. The door was locked. The child-safety lock was on. She had absolutely no chance. If there’s somebody else in the car, there’s actually a chance.”

Hours before the vigil, Nathaniel David Rowland, the man accused of killing Samantha Josephson, waived his appearance before a South Carolina judge.

Investigators haven’t said how Josephson died.

In Rowland’s car, the child safety locks were activated, meaning she couldn’t escape.

Her body was dumped 70 miles outside of Columbia.

In court, Marci Josephson, Samantha’s mother, held nothing back.

“His actions were senseless, vile and unacceptable,” Marci Josephson said. “It sickens us to think that his face was the last thing my baby girl saw on this earth. Does he even know her name?”

“He took away our daughter, a sister, a granddaughter, a niece, a cousin and a friend to so many,” she added. “His selfish, unspeakable and violent actions have created a hole in the universe, a hole in our universe and we see the unimaginable ripple effect in our world.”

Samantha Josephson was winding down time as a Gamecock and was looking forward to law school at Drexel University.

‘He’s A Humble Person’: Hundreds Raise Money For Philadelphia Highway Patrol Officer Andy Chan

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) – The prayers for recovery keep coming. Philadelphia police raised money for one of their own – Highway Patrol Officer Andy Chan – in Chinatown on Sunday.

Chan suffered traumatic brain injuries following a Jan. 3 accident when he was thrown from his motorcycle after it was struck by another driver who did not see him.

Now off a ventilator, Chan is breathing by himself but still cannot speak.

His cousin, Philip Wan, said almost three months later, the officer continues to make progress.

“He’s recovering. Day-to-day situation, these types of accidents take a long way to recover,” Wan said. “It’s been slow, positive signs thus far and we’re very hopeful he’ll come out on top.”

Philadelphia Highway Patrol Selling Commemorative Coins To Help Pay Bills Of Injured Officer Andy Chan

Hundreds of photos of Chan and his coworkers were displayed throughout Sunday’s fundraiser. After the accident, Chan’s family found all of the photos on a hard drive.

“We’re looking forward to the day where he can come full circle and be with us all again,” Philadelphia FOP Lodge 5 President John McNesby said

McNesby said the fundraiser was the FOP’s way of giving back to Chan. He said Chan was always the first one to support another officer whenever they needed it.

Family, Friends Hold Prayer Service For Philly Highway Patrol Officer Injured In Crash

“You would know when Andy came to work,” Kyle Cross, Chan’s former partner, said, “because he wouldn’t greet people like hello or hi, how we would. He would come in and say hi-way. The whole unit would know Andy is here.”

Wan knows exactly how his cousin would react if he knew he was the center of attention Sunday.

“He’s a humble person so he’d be embarrassed they had this for him,” Wan said. “He’s definitely very grateful and thankful to everyone.”

Man Arrested For Impersonating A Police Officer, Robbing Three People Of Marijuana In Abington Township, Police Say

ABINGTON TOWNSHIP, Pa. – Police say they’ve arrested a 42-year-old man pretending to be one of them in Montgomery County. The incident happened last Monday at 10 p.m. on the 1100 block of Colonial Avenue in the Roslyn section of Abington.

Authorities say Dennis McGowen approached a parked vehicle with three people inside with his SUV flashing white and blue lights. He allegedly screamed at the occupants that they were speeding and made an illegal U-turn.

McGowen then told the people inside the car, “give me the weed or I will let my dog out on you,” according to police.

Son Of Philadelphia Police Official Shot, Killed In FDR Park Saturday Night

The three people inside the car told police that they believed McGowen was a cop because of the flashing lights. They also told police that they saw a “Caution – K9 Inside” decal on the rear of the SUV as it drove away.

Police found the SUV unoccupied shortly after and observed a bag marked “police” and handcuffs inside.

42-Year-Old Man Shot, Killed Inside Vehicle In Pottstown, Police Say

McGowen is not a police officer in Abington Township or anywhere else, police say.

He was charged with robbery, false imprisonment, impersonating a public servant and other related offenses. He was arrested Saturday.

Morris Animal Refuge really lets the dogs out at 22nd annual Fur Ball

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — The Morris Animal Refuge hosted its 22nd annual Fur Ball this weekend. The organization’s biggest fundraiser promises entertainment, food and celebration, every year in support of homeless animals.

This year’s theme was “A night at the Carnival,” which included an open bar, popcorn bar, a tater tot bar and plenty of performances.

“Plenty of stuff to do here, we got boozy snow cones, we got playing and cuddling with puppies,” said Lewis Checchia, Executive Director of Morris Animal Refuge.

And yes, Checcia did say “cuddling with puppies.”

The pups that graced the party, trading cuddles and kisses in search of a new home, were the main attraction.

“I wanna take her home,” said Karen Feeney.

Reporter: Are you going to take her home?

“I’d love to,” Feeney responded.

That makes sense, as Checchia says this was a function for people who share a passion for animals.

“Everything goes to the shelter for caring for the animals keeping them, feeding them, doing medical care for them, really just making sure that they get forever homes and adopted out,” he explained.

If you missed the Fur Ball this year, no worries you can always support the cause at MorrisAnimalRefuge.org.

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Wawa Places Winning Bids For Liquor Licenses In Philadelphia, Delaware County

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) – A Philadelphia and Delaware County icon may soon begin selling alcohol at more stores in the region. Wawa placed two winning bids for liquor licenses in the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board’s March liquor license auction.

Wawa paid the top price for Philadelphia and Middleton Township in Delaware County. The winning bids were $186, 357 for Philadelphia and $160,357 for Middletown Township.

Eyewitness News reached out to Wawa for more information on its plans with the liquor licenses. At this moment, it’s unclear what the company’s intentions are.

Police: Don’t Feed Wild Turkeys In Wawa Parking Lot

Just because Wawa placed the winning bids for Philadelphia and Delaware County does not necessarily mean the company has been awarded the licenses – yet. There are two more steps to take.

According to the Liquor Control Board, top bidders have 14 days from the Notice of Selection to remit full bid payment to the state. Then, they have six months to file a license application with the PLCB.

There is only one Wawa in Pennsylvania that sells alcohol – Store No. 170 in Chadds Ford, Delaware County.

Hundreds turn out to support injured Philly police officer: ‘He means the world to us’

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — It was day full of both support and emotion at a fundraiser for the Philadelphia highway patrolman who was critically injured in the line of duty earlier this year.

“He means the world to us,” Doreen Devil said with tears in her eyes. “He’s a great guy.”

Devlin was emotional as she spoke about Officer Andy Chan.

Just days into the New Year, Chan was on his police motorcycle heading to work when authorities say he was struck by a van.

Now months later, Chan’s sister Serena tells KYW Newsradio that the injured officer is “coming along.”

“It’s a traumatic brain injury,” she explained. “A brain is a miraculous organ. He’ll get there — it’s just a matter of time.”

Chan’s friends and colleagues all poured into a Chinatown restaurant Sunday to raise money to help his family.

Kyle Cross, Chan’s former partner, says they do it for him because he would do the same for them.

“Forty or fifty hours a week you’re with them more than you’re with your family, Cross said. “Words can’t explain what he means to me.”

The crowd bought custom made t-shirts and challenge coins to benefit the Chan family.

“We’re here to support them, to help’em out in any way we can,” said Chan’s colleague Ed Ruth. “Every little bit helps toward the bills and other things.”

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Dr. Marciene Mattleman, education and literacy trailblazer, dies at 89

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — A major advocate and trailblazer of children’s literacy in Philadelphia died Friday after a long battle with Parkinson’s disease.

For years, Dr. Marciene Mattleman worked as KYW Newsradio’s education reporter, but that was just one part of her legacy.

“My mom was probably the most passionate, persistent person anyone will ever know. When she saw that kids needed after school activities, she created after school activities, partnerships to make that happen,” said daughter Ellen Mattleman Kaplan.

She says her mother was always willing to work with and help people.

“Wherever she went, people would stop her on the street and said, ‘you taught me to read,'” she added. 

Mattleman started five nonprofits, including Philadelphia Futures, a program that’s been replicated across the country.

She was honored at the White House by President Bill Clinton for that work.

She also worked to improve education with Ed Rendell when he was mayor of Philadelphia.

“She was as caring a person as I’ve ever met in my long life of politics and government. She cared about our kids, and she cared about education, and she cared about kids that couldn’t read. She dedicated her life improving the opportunities those kids had,” Rendell said. 

As a teacher, she taught sixth-graders, then went on to become a professor of English education at Temple University.

She died Friday night at the age of 89.

This comes after a four-year fight with Parkinson’s disease, something KYW Newsradio’s medical contributor Dr. Brian McDonough says is ever-increasing with the country’s aging population.

“It slows people down, and some of the symptoms include muscular rigidity. Their faces overtime will have less expression, and there’s also issues as far as hand movement,” McDonough said. 

Mattleman Kaplan says her mom fought Parkinson’s to the end.

Mattleman leaves behind three kids, six grandkids and her husband Herman, who she was married to for 69 years.

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Philadelphia streets filled with runners for Love Run Half Marathon

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — The streets of Philadelphia were jampacked with thousands of runners who laced up to help fight cancer Sunday morning. 

Over 10,000 people participated in this year’s Love Run, including the brother and sister combo of Jim and Jen Barnes, wearing their matching running attire. 

“(Jim) did it last year and the way he described it was amazing, so I decided to do it this year to get back into running and do something together because we don’t live near each other anymore,” said Jen. 

The half-marathon raises money for cancer patients in Philadelphia who need some financial help and for cancer research, so all the runners are winners on this day.

But that doesn’t mean we won’t see a little sibling rivalry. 

“We’re competitive. I’m going to finish first,” Jim said.

“Yea, he’s going to finish first,” Jen added. 

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Son of top Philadelphia police commander shot and killed after Phillies game

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — The son of a top Philadelphia police commander was shot and killed Saturday night in South Philadelphia following the Phillies game. 

Nicholas Flacco was celebrating the Phillies win against the Braves with friends in FDR Park at Broad and Pattison streets around 10 p.m., when his group got into an argument with another and shots were fired.  

Flacco, 20, was shot in the chest. He was taken to Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead by doctors. 

Flacco is the son of Chief Inspector Chris Flacco, who works in the department’s internal affairs unit. 

Detectives are now investigating and no arrests have been made. 

The homicide rate is up nearly 10% from this time last year. 

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This is a developing story. Stay with KYW Newsradio for updates. 

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Negotiations to continue Monday as 12,000 CCP staffers await new deal

UPDATED: 11:30 P.M.

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — Contract negotiations will continue Monday as the faculty union and the Community College of Philadelphia administration failed to come to an agreement.

Talks ran late into the night Sunday, as a last-ditch effort to prevent 12,000 staffers from going on strike. 

Union officials tell KYW Newsradio that the community college staffers have gone nearly three years without a new contract.

Courseload and compensation are the major sticking points. 

Negotiation are expected to resume around noon Monday.

PREVIOUSLY: 

Negotiations resume Sunday night in a last-ditch effort to avert a faculty strike at Community College of Philadelphia. 

The faculty union hasn’t said when they might strike — but if they’re not satisfied with the pace of progress, they could set up picket lines at any time. CCP and the 1200-member union have gone nearly three years without a new contract. Courseload and compensation are the major sticking points. The union presented what it called a “pre-strike” offer on Tuesday, although Union co-president John Braxton says there hasn’t been much movement lately.
     
“Ever since May, they’ve said nothing except, ‘here’s your final offer, take it or leave it,'” Braxton said. “And we’ve said, ‘well, what about this and what about that? Could we compromise on this and that?’ And they’ve just said, ‘we gave you our last, best, final offer.'”

CCP President Dr. Donald “Guy” Generals says the union proposal is unsustainable.

RELATED: Community College of Philadelphia faculty, staff vote to strike

“We think the best and final is fair. More than fair,” he said. “We think the compensation package is still among the best, if not the best, and when I say compensation, I mean insurance and the actual pay, if not the best of all the community colleges in this area.”      

Jeremiah White, the chair of CCP’s board of trustees, questioned the union’s timing, threatening a job action so soon before graduation.
     
“A month before, and you’re going to strike? And all these families and everybody’s prepared to graduate? It makes no sense to me,” White said. “And we hope that the union will not strike before people have an opportunity to graduate.”

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Program helps transgender women find the voice that fits who they are

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — Sunday marks International Transgender Day of Visibility, a day many people show their support for the transgender community. KYW Newsradio caught up with a program that supports and works with transgender women throughout the year.

“Sunlight strikes raindrops in the air, they break into a prism and form a rainbow. A rainbow is a division of white light into many beautiful colors,” said Erica Cirulli.

For three semesters, Cirulli did voice exercises like the “Rainbow” poem at Temple University’s free student run speech clinic for transgender women, as she transformed her voice to a more feminine sound while transitioning her body.

“One thing we focused on is adjusting my pitch to be high enough to both sound and feel comfortable for me, and for those that I was talking to, to make it sound like it was my voice, not just a female  but that it matched my body,” Cirulli said.

She says the program did wonders for her voice and self-esteem.

“In order to present the way I wanted to present I knew that my old voice just wouldn’t do,” she said. “It was extremely deep.  It was at the lower end of the male range, as far as pitch goes.”

Maria Dicindio, a graduate student clinician with the program, says a lot of work goes into helping the women get the voices they are looking for.

“We work with some nonverbal communication characteristics as well, things like moving at the elbow rather than moving at the shoulders, body positioning,” she said.

Cirulli says the program was an invaluable component to her transition.

“To be able to feel comfortable with how I sounded — it meant the world to me,” she explained.

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Uncorking the annual event that only improves with age: Philly Wine Week returns

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — What’s red, white and filled with brotherly love – that’s right Philly Wine Week is back!

Founding Philly Wine Week Board Member Jill Weber says the fun with begin with their annual opening corks kickoff Sunday night.

“So everybody fills up their glass, hopefully with the favorite wine maybe that you’ve been trying for the last hour or two, and we do a toast to the week and a toast to wine and toast to Philly.”

Weber says that this week will not only be full of vino but tons of great wine-centric events.

“You can look for 50+ restaurants in the city,” she said. “Some of your favorites, maybe some you’ve never been to, who are wine-centric, who love wine and we will feature wine events for you!”

These tasty events, and sometimes quirky events, can include everything from happy hours to flight tastings or even wine word Scrabble.

“Jet is having what we’re calling, ‘Wine Rules Scrabble.’ We’ll have Scrabble boards, I’m sure people will bring them as well; but every wine term that normally would be illegal because it’s usually a proper noun or maybe a French word borrowed term is worth double the points,” she explains.

Weber says opening corks will take place Sunday night on the 19th floor of the Bellevue Hotel, right on Broad Street.

For a more information make sure you check out PhillyWineWeek.org before it all ends on April 7.

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Program helps transgender woman find the voice that fits who they are

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — Sunday marks International Transgender Day of Visibility, a day many people show their support for the transgender community. KYW Newsradio caught up with a program that supports and works with transgender women throughout the year.

“Sunlight strikes raindrops in the air, they break into a prism and form a rainbow. A rainbow is a division of white light into many beautiful colors,” said Erica Cirulli.

For three semesters, Cirulli did voice exercises like the “Rainbow” poem at Temple University’s free student run speech clinic for transgender women, as she transformed her voice to a more feminine sound while transitioning her body.

“One thing we focused on is adjusting my pitch to be high enough to both sound and feel comfortable for me, and for those that I was talking to, to make it sound like it was my voice, not just a female  but that it matched my body,” Cirulli said.

She says the program did wonders for her voice and self-esteem.

“In order to present the way I wanted to present I knew that my old voice just wouldn’t do,” she said. “It was extremely deep.  It was at the lower end of the male range, as far as pitch goes.”

Maria Dicindio, a graduate student clinician with the program, says a lot of work goes into helping the women get the voices they are looking for.

“We work with some nonverbal communication characteristics as well, things like moving at the elbow rather than moving at the shoulders, body positioning,” she said.

Cirulli says the program was an invaluable component to her transition.

“To be able to feel comfortable with how I sounded — it meant the world to me,” she explained.

___

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New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir Grewal takes several chemical companies to court

TOTOWA, NJ (KYW Newsradio) — Just days after New Jersey environmental officials went after several chemical companies to discover the extent of toxic pollutants, three of those companies have been sued by the state Attorney General. 

Gurbir Grewal filed suits against DuPont and spinoff Chemours for problems dating back decades at four of their facilities, two of them in Carney’s Point, Salem County and Greenwich Township, Gloucester County.

“We allege at DuPont discharged PFAs chemicals despite knowing that these chemicals are linked to numerous serious environmental and health risks, including kidney and liver damage,” Grewal told reporters at a press conference in Totowa, Passaic County. “They decided to put profit above the safety of New Jersey’s residents.”

The announcement was made near the Pompton Lakes Works where more than 300 homes have complained about contamination for decades and where DuPont has worked for some 20 years to repair the damage.

Related: NJ wants chemical companies to cough up info on PFA contamination

The Department of Environmental Protection already issued a directive on those firms, as well as Dow, 3M and Solvay to disclose the full extent of PFAs contamination and cover the cost of cleanup and remediation. 

These suits are for Natural Resource Damages and 3M is included as a defendant. 3M was the primary manufacturer of PFAs. 

“We won’t be able to clean our state’s industrial and toxic legacy overnight,” Grewal added, “but we are going to do whatever we can to force polluters to clean up the natural resources that they have harmed.”

Chemours said it was “surprised and disappointed” by the filings, DuPont says it’s worked on remediation for two decades and 3M will “vigorously defend its record of environmental stewardship.”

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Negotiations resume as Community College of Philadelphia tries to avert faculty strike

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — Negotiations resume Sunday night in a last-ditch effort to avert a faculty strike at Community College of Philadelphia. 

The faculty union hasn’t said when they might strike — but if they’re not satisfied with the pace of progress, they could set up picket lines at any time. CCP and the 1200-member union have gone nearly three years without a new contract. Courseload and compensation are the major sticking points. The union presented what it called a “pre-strike” offer on Tuesday, although Union co-president John Braxton says there hasn’t been much movement lately.
     
“Ever since May, they’ve said nothing except, ‘here’s your final offer, take it or leave it,'” Braxton said. “And we’ve said, ‘well, what about this and what about that? Could we compromise on this and that?’ And they’ve just said, ‘we gave you our last, best, final offer.'”

RELATED: Community College of Philadelphia faculty, staff vote to strike

CCP President Dr. Donald “Guy” Generals says the union proposal is unsustainable.

“We think the best and final is fair. More than fair,” he said. “We think the compensation package is still among the best, if not the best, and when I say compensation, I mean insurance and the actual pay, if not the best of all the community colleges in this area.”
      
Jeremiah White, the chair of CCP’s board of trustees, questioned the union’s timing, threatening a job action so soon before graduation.
     
“A month before, and you’re going to strike? And all these families and everybody’s prepared to graduate? It makes no sense to me,” White said. “And we hope that the union will not strike before people have an opportunity to graduate.”

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