Pa. prisons on lockdown as mystery illness probed

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Pennsylvania’s state prisons are on lockdown after staff members at a fourth prison required treatment in recent weeks from exposure to a yet-unidentified substance described as a liquid synthetic drug.

The Department of Corrections announced the step Wednesday, a couple hours after it reported that two guards and three nurses at Albion state prison reported feeling sick and required medical attention.

The department didn’t say how long the lockdown will last. 
In the meantime, it’s suspending prison visits, closing mailrooms to non-legal mail and requiring all employees to use gloves and other protective equipment.

Pennsylvania previously reported five separate cases between Aug. 6 and Aug. 13 in which 18 employees in three other western Pennsylvania prisons showed symptoms that required medical treatment.

Prison staff also is to use extra caution with parole violators and newly arrived inmates.

Pennsylvania prisons on lockdown as mystery illnesses probed

Pennsylvania’s state prisons are on lockdown after staff members required treatment in recent weeks from exposure to a yet-unidentified substance described as a liquid synthetic drug.

The Department of Corrections announced the step Wednesday, following the news that guards and nurses were treated for possible drug exposure inside an Ohio prison.

The department didn’t say how long the lockdown will last.

In the meantime, it’s suspending prison visits, closing mailrooms to non-legal mail and requiring all employees to use gloves and other personal protective equipment.

Pennsylvania previously reported five separate cases between Aug. 6 and Aug. 13 in which 18 employees in three western Pennsylvania prisons showed symptoms that required medical treatment.

Prison staff is to use extra caution with parole violators and newly arrived inmates.

Made in America fest: Everything you need to know

– Philadelphia’s seventh iteration of the Made in America festival kicks off this Saturday, with Nicki Minaj, Meek Mill and Post Malone among the artists slated to perform.

Here is everything you need to know:

DATES

Saturday, Aug. 1 – Sunday, Aug. 2

TIMING

Performances are slated to begin at 1 p.m., with doors opening at noon each day. Performances will run until around midnight on Saturday and 11:30 p.m. on Sunday.

ROAD CLOSURES & PARKING RESTRICTIONS

A number of street closures and parking restrictions will be in effect throughout the city. See here for complete details.

SEPTA SERVICE

Broad Street and Market Frankford Lines:

  • Local train service will operate on a normal weekend schedule throughout the day on Saturday and Sunday.

Regional Rail:

  • Late-night train service will be available on SEPTA’s Regional Rail Lines on Saturday and Sunday nights departing from Jefferson, Suburban and 30th Street Stations.
  • See here for full details.

Bus:

  • SEPTA Routes 7, 32, 33, 38, 43 and 48 will be detoured from their normal routes through the Benjamin Franklin Parkway area from 10 a.m. on Friday, Aug. 31 through 5 am on Monday, Sept. 3.
  • See here for full details.

ITEMS ALLOWED AT FESTIVAL

  • Factory-sealed plastic water bottles 1 per person up to 1 liter
  • Empty plastic water containers 1 per person up to 64 ounces for re-use at water refill stations (drinking water will be available for purchase and there will be water stations for re-filling bottles)
  • Empty hydration packs of any kind (backpacks, waistbands or other hydration items and inserts)
  • One small non-framed backpack or bag subject to search and re-search (all searched bags will be tagged following search)
  • Blankets and towels
  • Umbrellas (small hand-held only)
  • Non-professional cameras, flip-cams, camera phones
  • Sunscreen, sunglasses, government issued I.D., cash/debit cards/credit cards are encouraged

ITEMS NOT ALLOWED

  • Weapons and contraband of any kind (regardless of permitting, e.g. Right-to-Carry permits will not be honored and weapons will be confiscated)
  • Masks of any kind
  • Drones
  • Fireworks or explosives
  • Illegal or illicit substances of any kind
  • Food and non-water beverages including alcohol taken in from the outside
  • Pets (except trained service animals)
  • Flyers, handbills, posters, stickers (no solicitation allowed)
  • Chairs
  • Glass containers
  • Skateboards, motorized vehicles or scooters
  • Coolers
  • Professional recording devices or cameras (no detachable lenses or tripods meant for   commercial use)
  • Fluorescent plastic lights (glow sticks)
  • Laser pointers
  • Items that would obstruct others’ view of the stages (kites, flag poles, large signs, etc.)

WEATHER

Morning thunderstorms are expected Saturday with highs in the low 80s. Morning showers and thunderstorms are also expected Sunday with his in the upper 80s. To download the FOX 29 Weather Authority App, see here.

ADDITIONAL INFO

For additional information about the festival, see here.

Made in America road closures, parking info

– There are dozens of street closures and parking restrictions that will be in effect across Philadelphia for the Made in America festival Saturday and Sunday. A detailed list of closures and restrictions by date can be found below.

For a full list of festival details, including timing, see here.

ROAD CLOSURES

Phase 1: 7 a.m. Sunday, Aug. 26 – 11:59 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 4

  • Two lanes of Eakins Oval in front of the Philadelphia Art Museum

Phase 2: 7 a.m. Monday, Aug. 27 – 5 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 4

  • Spring Garden Street between Pennsylvania Avenue and Benjamin Franklin Parkway

Phase 3: 7 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 28 – 11:59 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 4

  • Parking prohibited on Pennsylvania Avenue from 22nd Street to 23rd Street (south side) and Park Towne Place from 22nd Street to 24th Street (north side)

Phase 4: 10 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 29 – 5 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 4

  • The inner lanes of Benjamin Franklin Parkway, between 20th Street and Eakins Oval
  • Cross traffic on numbered streets will be permitted

Phase 5: 7 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 30 – 5 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 4

  • 22nd Street reduced to one running lane between Pennsylvania Avenue and Benjamin Franklin Parkway

Phase 6: 10 a.m. Friday, Aug. 31 – 5 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 4

  • Outer lanes of Benjamin Franklin Parkway, between 20th Street and Eakins Oval
  • 23rd Street, between Pennsylvania Avenue and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
  • 22nd Street, between Pennsylvania Avenue and Park Towne Place
  • 21st Street, between Pennsylvania Avenue and Winter Street
  • Kelly Drive outbound, from Benjamin Franklin Parkway to Fairmount Avenue
  • Outer lane of MLK Drive adjacent to Paine’s Park

Starting at 10 a.m. Friday, Aug. 31, traffic headed inbound (to Center City) from Spring Garden Street Bridge or Martin Luther King Drive must exit Eakins Oval on the 24th Street ramp. Traffic headed inbound on Kelly Drive must exit Kelly Drive at Fairmount Avenue.

Phase 7: 10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 1 – 5 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 4

The full extent of road closures around the festival site will begin at 10 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 1 and remain through the duration of the event.

  • The entire width of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, starting at 20th Street and extending through Eakins Oval (25th Street) and behind the Philadelphia Museum of Art
  • 21st Street, between Winter and Spring Garden Streets
  • 22nd Street, between Race Street and Fairmount Avenue
  • 23rd Street, between the Benjamin Franklin Parkway and Fairmount Avenue
  • 24th Street, between Fairmount and Pennsylvania Avenues
  • Spring Garden Street, between 20th Street & Benjamin Franklin Parkway, including the Spring
  • Garden Street Tunnel
  • Spring Garden St Bridge* (the city will try to keep bridge open during museum operation hours but may be forced to close)
  • Kelly Drive, between 23rd Street and Fairmount Avenue
  • Martin Luther King Drive, between the Falls Bridge and  Benjamin Franklin Parkway
  • Pennsylvania Avenue, between Hamilton and 25th Street
  • 2000 block of Pennsylvania Avenue, between the Whole Foods store and 21st Street (the eastern half of the block, from the Whole Foods to 20th Street, will remain open)
  • Park Towne Place, between 22nd and 24th Streets
  • I-676 westbound off-ramp at 22nd Street (I-676 eastbound off-ramp at 23rd Street will be open)

No Parking

Temporary no parking restrictions will be in place for the streets listed below:

  • Pennsylvania Avenue, between 22nd Street and Fairmount Avenue (south side of street)
  • Winter Street, between 20th and 22nd Streets (both sides of street)
  • 20th Street, between Vine and Callowhill Streets (east side of street)
  • 21st Street, between Benjamin Franklin Parkway and Race Street (both sides of street)
  • 22nd Street, between Winter and Spring Garden Streets (both sides of street)
  • Park Towne Place, between 22nd and 24th Streets (both sides of street)

Sports betting 101: Your ultimate guide to gambling on football in PA, NJ and DE

Hello, PhillyVoice readers. Kyle Scott of Crossing Broad here. I’ve spent the better part of the summer learning the ins and outs of legal sports betting, specifically as it relates to our area — Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware. 

While the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn a 1992 law which effectively banned sports betting outside of Nevada generated headlines about the dawn of legal sports betting in the U.S., the reality is that this will be a long, slow process, even if sports wagering is already pervasive in our culture. Luckily, our area is poised to lead this charge as the three aforementioned states are among the first to legalize it. The editors here have asked me to put together a guide for each of the three states, so you know where, when, and how you can bet on football this fall.

First up, as the politicians say, the great state of Delaware.

Delaware

The First State, wholly unironically, earned its moniker when it actually beat New Jersey, the state responsible for bringing the issue to the Supreme Court in the first place, to implement sports betting earlier this year.

On June 5, Delaware began accepting sports wagers at Delaware Park, Dover Downs, and Harrington Raceway. Governor John Carney placed the first bet – a $10 winner on the Phillies – to get the ball rolling.

Initially, the state’s three casinos will be the only locations where you can place individual game bets. We’re talking physical locations. No online sports betting… at least not yet. State officials are open to considering this down the line, and would be wise to do so, but for now punters will be relegated to one of these three casinos.

Interestingly, Delaware had already allowed gambling on professional football through parlay bets (multi-game wagers). Besides the casinos, action was offered at a wide assortment of businesses, so the infrastructure was in place to accept legal sports wagers, perhaps ex-plaining why Delaware was so quick to implement individual game betting.

Pennsylvania

Get ready to be exhausted.

Sports betting is legal in Pennsylvania, as the state actually passed a law last year. The prob-lem, however, is the absurd costs that licensed operators will have to incur: a flat $10 million up-front fee to obtain the license, and 36% tax rate.

That cost is prohibitive on several fronts. 

First and foremost, it’s relatively expensive. Consider that in New Jersey the license fee is only $100,000 with an 8.5% tax rate for casino-based betting and a 13% tax rate online.

At the East Coast Gaming Congress in Atlantic City in June, where the industry’s leaders, eve-ryone from regulators to sportsbook execs, came together to discuss, among other things, the future of sports betting in the U.S., the case for a tax rate of no more than 15%-20% was presented as the optimum rate to maximize income for the state without sacrificing overall revenue. 

This isn’t just industry self-interest— it’s actually about competitive balance. There is a thriv-ing illegal offshore betting market, which, due to none of its operators having to pay any taxes, can offer attractive odds and a cheap juice (or “vig”), which is the amount sportsbook charges gamblers on losing bets. 

Contrary to what your view of sportsbooks might be, they are low-margin businesses, and a 36% tax rate is highly restrictive. William Hill CEO Joe Asher, whose company is a leading sportsbook in Nevada and backed the opening offerings in Delaware and Monmouth Park in New Jersey, told PhillyVoice earlier this summer that he hasn’t invested in PA and, “The legal market in Pennsylvania could be very small — smaller than it should be — because of this tax rate.”

This is all a long-winded way of telling you that you can’t place a legal sports bet anywhere in Pennsylvania yet.

At that same conference in June, the director of licensing for the PA Gaming Control Board, Susan Hensel, said she expected casino-based sports betting to be live by the start of foot-ball season, with online sports betting to follow sometime in the fall. 

Thus far, however, only Penn National Gaming, which owns the Hollywood Casino at Penn Na-tional Race Course casino in Grantville, and Greenwood Gaming, owners of Parx and the Turf Club, have applied for licenses, though several operators, including Mount Airy Casino Re-sorts and Harrah’s, have indicated that they plan to do so. When you factor in the time it takes to review and approve these applications, it seems highly unlikely that you’ll be able to place a bet anywhere by Week 1 of the NFL season, and certainly not online.

That said, legal sports betting is coming to Pennsylvania, and soon-ish. DraftKings has plans to offer its online sportsbook here, but it will have to partner with a licensed operator to do so. So will FanDuel.

BetStars has partnered with Mount Airy Casino Resort to bring its sports betting brand to PA. 

Though there is much to be determined, it looks like Hollywood Casino at Penn National Race Course and Parx may be first to go live, with other casinos and online sports betting to follow perhaps later in the year… maybe in time to bet on another Super Bowl run.

We’ve put together a list of sports betting sites that we will update as online sports betting is offered in PA.

New Jersey

This is where the rubber hits the road.

Sports betting is live and rolling, both in-person and online, in New Jersey.

Thus far, these are the casinos with physical sportsbooks:

•  Monmouth Park
•  Borgata
•  Ocean Resort
•  The Meadowlands
•  Harrah’s
•  Resorts
•  Bally’s
•  Golden Nugget

Additionally, and probably more interesting to this audience, is the availability of online sports betting in New Jersey. So far, three sportsbooks are live and accepting bets:

•  DraftKings Sportsbook
•  SugarHouse Sportsbook
•  PlayMGM

By Week 1, several others are expected to follow suit, including FanDuel Sportsbook, BetStars, and 888sport. 

The latter two may be unfamiliar to U.S. bettors, but BetStars – owned by The Stars Group (PokerStars) – is an established European brand, as is 888. Both of these operators plan to figure heavily in legal U.S. sports betting, as European operators have experience in the space, particularly with live betting, which we’ll get to in a second.

Later in the year, apps from William Hill, PointsBet, and several others are expected to follow suit.

As you might expect, you can bet on a wide array of sports at any of these sportsbooks. DraftKings Sportsbook, for example, offers betting on everything from baseball to college football and golf. All of the expected bets are there, including point spread bets, totals, mon-eylines, props, parlays and, most importantly, live betting.

Live betting, sometimes referred to as in-play betting, allows bettors to place bets throughout the course of a sporting event, greatly increasing engagement. Lines are updated in real-time based on the current score and other factors. What’s more, you can bet on short-term events like quarters, series, plays, at-bats, and perhaps even pitches. And this is where the growth and future of sports betting lives.t

In Europe, upwards of 70% of bets are some form of mobile or in-play bet. All the focus in the ea
rly going here has been on physical sportsbooks, and though they will generate some buzz, especially for Atlantic City, it’s the mobile betting (still backed by these casinos, by the way) that really matters.t

So how does it work in New Jersey?

The good news is that, like the casinos themselves, you don’t have to live in the state to play— you only have to be in it while placing your bet. This is thanks to geo-location tracking built into the apps. So if you work in New Jersey, frequently drive through it, or vacation at the shore, you are eligible to play.

For more, you can check out our guide to NJ online sports betting so you stay updated on the latest sites to go live.

So that’s where everything stands: In Delaware you can bet at three casinos. In PA, you can’t bet anywhere yet, but soon will be able to at select casinos and eventually online. And in New Jersey, the floodgates have opened. You can check out CrossingBroad.com for more.

Delaware police kill paraplegic suspect during raid; cousin calls shooting ‘unjust’

Delaware State Police are investigating the death of 50-year-old Robert Knox, a paraplegic man who was shot by police in Harbeson Tuesday morning.

Police were executing a search warrant at the Harbeson Road residence of Knox’s father after 6 a.m. as part of three-week drug investigation.

Two men were taken into custody without incident, but Knox reached for a handgun as he was being arrested, police said.

Police said a struggle over the weapon ensued, and two officers shot Knox, who was transported to Beebe Medical Center where he died from his injuries.

Police first reported that Knox was in bed at the time of the struggle.

Both officers, who have been state troopers for seven and eight years, have been placed on administrative leave, which is standard policy. The officers were not wearing body cameras, a police spokeswoman said.

According to court documents, 82-year-old Andrew Knox was charged with illegal drug activity and weapons offenses. Because of a prior felony conviction, he was prohibited from owning the weapons.

While the older Knox was detained inside the residence, police seized four weapons and ammunition from his bedroom. Police also seized cocaine, marijuana, methamphetamine and prescription pills and $23,000 in suspected drug proceeds. Andrew Knox was released on $13,000 unsecured bail, court documents said.

Those documents omitted mention of the fatal shooting.

Knox’s cousin Brenda Saunders, who lives in Philadelphia, said Wednesday the whole family is in shock.

“He’s in a wheelchair. How much struggling could you have done to a person who can’t move himself? So I feel it’s unjust,” she said. “Even with the circumstances of what they found in his home, they could have done a better job, even if he had a gun.

“Nobody deserves to be shot by anybody, period. They just need to take the guns away — just take them away.”

Police also arrested Andrew Ayers, 54, in connection with the three-week drug investigation. He was charged with an array of drug offenses as well as weapons offenses. He was sent to the Sussex Correctional Institution on $100,200.00 secured bond.

Lauren Vidas, a lawyer and lobbyist who worked for former Mayor Michael Nutter, has launched a bid to unseat 2nd District Councilman Kenyatta Johnson

Lauren Vidas, a lawyer and lobbyist who once worked as an assistant finance director under then-Mayor Michael Nutter, has launched a long-rumored bid against Philadelphia 2nd District Councilman Kenyatta Johnson.

“I’ve always been passionate about public service. No one who knows me is surprised I’m running,” she told City & State PA, of her bid for the 2019 Democratic Primary nomination.

The district covers Southwest Philadelphia and many gentrifying neighborhoods in the western portion of South Philly. Vidas, who filed campaign paperwork last week, said she would run on a platform aimed at staunching growing economic inequality in the district.

“You hear about this red-hot economy but people are wondering why their wages are so low and their housing is getting more expensive. There doesn’t seem to be a plan to address that,” she said.

Vidas has a long history in the chamber – she served as a legislative aide to former Council member Bill Green, helping to successfully file suit against her future boss after Nutter sought the closure of numerous libraries as a cost-cutting mechanism. She said the suit “put her on the mayor’s radar” and she would later take a job under Nutter’s finance chief, Rob Dubow.

After leaving the Nutter administration, she worked for years as a lobbyist alongside her father, Ed Hazzouri, at the eponymous firm they co-founded in 2013, and later served on Mayor Jim Kenney’s transition team. Until leaving the position last week to campaign full-time, she managed East Coast client relationships for the government advising firm PFM.

Hazzouri had long handled lobbying efforts for the politically influential law firm Cozen O’Connor. Vidas said her father would play a minimal role in her campaign.

“I made this decision independently to run. It’s something I’ve wanted to do for years. I do not anticipate nor is there a plan for him to play more than the normal role that any supportive parent would play when their child sought public office,” she said. “I’m not doing this at his urging, but because I want to serve the 2nd District.”

Were she to be elected, she emphasized, she would work with the city’s ethics board to ensure that her family ties would not create a conflict – Hazzouri & Associates still lobbies City Council on behalf of clients like the American Beverage Association. City ethics guidelines would likely require her recusal from legislative matters linked to those entities.

On policy, Vidas described herself ideologically as a “pragmatic progressive” and said she planned to campaign by emphasizing affordable housing issues and education. She said the city should experiment with community land trusts – city-affiliated nonprofit organizations that affordably lease housing to low-income buyers, sharing in equity along the way – and what she terms “strategic upzoning” to add more housing to the burgeoning district.

“The idea that we’re building half-million dollar, single-family housing on Broad Street” – a major city thoroughfare with a subway line running directly underneath – “is just one example where development is happening in a way that’s going to drive up costs for everyone else rather than putting more units on the market,” she explained.

On education, Vidas said she wanted to see more community partnerships designed to send money and other resources to local public schools. She had served on the board of Stanton Community Partners, a consortium of parents and neighbors designed to enhance operations at E.M. Stanton Elementary.

As an openly gay candidate who has worked with the Liberty City Democratic Club, a progressive LGBT political advocacy group, Vidas also said she would pitch a raft of broad progressive policies as gay-rights issues.

“It’s important to recognize that public education could be an LGBT issue if a gay couple wants to send their kid to a neighborhood school. If they’re struggling to make ends meet, the economy is an LGBT issue,” she said.

Vidas is only the second candidate to declare in a City Council district to date – public schools advocate Tonya Bah launched a bid against 8th District Council member Cindy Bass earlier this year. She said this was in part due to advantages enjoyed by district incumbents – more time to fundraise, established neighborhood connections, better name recognition – but that this trend deprived voters of serious discussion about local policy issues.

“There’s a real sense of the power of incumbency. It’s not easy to put yourself out on a limb and run against an incumbent,” she said. “But, regardless of who wins, the district will be better off by having a choice and having conversations that don’t happen unless incumbents get challenged.”

Johnson, first elected in 2011 after the retirement of longtime Council member Anna Verna, was last challenged by local developer Ori Feibush in 2015. Their costly and acrimonious battle divided many in the neighborhood over issues linked to rapid development and gentrification. Johnson won handily, but Feibush would later sue the councilman, whom he has long accused of meddling with development projects.

Vidas appeared to strike a decidedly different tone as Johnson, an ally of state Sen. Tony Williams and a former state rep himself, runs for a third term in office.

“I’m not running against Kenyatta personally; I’m running for the 2nd District,” she said.

Mark Nevins, a campaign advisor to Johnson, said the councilman “looked forward to having a positive conversation with voters” over the coming year.

“Councilman Johnson is going to continue working on important issues like taking on gun violence, expanding access to pre-K for Philadelphia kids, and making sure we create good jobs with good wages and provide affordable housing to every family in the 2nd District, regardless of the neighborhood in which they live.”

California becomes first state to end cash bail after 40-year fight

California will become the first state in the nation to abolish bail for suspects awaiting trial under a sweeping reform bill signed by Gov. Jerry Brown on Tuesday.

An overhaul of the state’s bail system has been in the works for years, and became an inevitability earlier this year when a California appellate court declared the state’s cash bail system unconstitutional. The new law goes into effect in October 2019.

“Today, California reforms its bail system so that rich and poor alike are treated fairly,” Brown said in a statement, moments after signing the California Money Bail Reform Act.

The governor has waited nearly four decades to revamp the state’s cash bail system. In his 1979 State of the State Address, Brown argued the existing process was biased, favoring the wealthy who can afford to pay for their freedom, and penalizing the poor, who often are forced to remain in custody.

“Our path to a more just criminal justice system is not complete, but today it made a transformational shift away from valuing private wealth and toward protecting public safety,” Sen. Robert Herzberg, a co-author of the bill, said in a statement. “California will continue to lead the way toward a safer and more equitable system.”

Washington, D.C., already has a cashless bail system. Other states, including New Jersey, have passed laws that reduce their reliance on money bail. And other states are considering making similar changes.

Under the California law those arrested and charged with a crime won’t be putting up money or borrowing it from a bail bond agent to obtain their release. Instead, local courts will decide who to keep in custody and whom to release while they await trial. Those decisions will be based on an algorithm created by the courts in each jurisdiction.

In most nonviolent misdemeanor cases, defendants would be released within 12 hours. In other instances, defendants will be scored on how likely they are to show up for their court date, the seriousness of their crime, and the likelihood of recidivism.

Some people could be released on other conditions, including monitoring by GPS or regular check-ins with an officer.

The goal of the legislation is to eliminate human bias in court proceedings, but critics argue the new system that will be created by the courts runs the risk of perpetuating discrimination.

Meanwhile, the American Civil Liberties Union of California, an original co-sponsor of the bill, pulled its support, arguing that last-minute changes give judges too much discretion in determining under what circumstances people will be released or kept in custody.

“We are concerned that the system that’s being put into place by this bill is too heavily weighted toward detention and does not have sufficient safeguards to ensure that racial justice is provided in the new system,” the ACLU’s Natasha Minsker told NPR,

Raj Jayadev, co-founder of advocacy organization Silicon Valley De-Bug, said like the ACLU, his group is a former supporter of the bill. Ultimately, as it is written, he told the Sacramento Bee, the law discriminates against the poor.

“They took our rallying cry of ending money bail and used it against us to further threaten and criminalize and jail our loved ones.”

And there’s the end to the state’s bail bond industry.

“We’re gone. We’re done. As of today the bail industry will start shuttering their doors,” Topo Padilla, President of the Golden State Bail Agents Association told NPR. The Wall Street Journal reports that that could affect 7,000 jobs, though Jeff Clayton, president of the American Bail Coalition, told NPR station KQED that it’s likely that the bail industry will sue, putting the law on hold.

Padilla contended the law is bad for the people of California.

The law “straps the taxpayers with funding 100 percent of all pretrial release programs,” and will lead to increasing detentions of people who otherwise would post bail, he said.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Mychal Kendricks charged for insider trading

– Former Philadelphia Eagle linebacker Mychal Kendricks has been charged with alleged insider trading.

U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania William McSwain held a press conference to announce the criminal charges Wednesday.

Authorities say Kendricks made a large profit, around 1.2 million, from the alleged trading activity.

Prosecutors also charged TV writer Damilare Sonoiki with helping to facilitate Kendricks’ stock trades. Officials say Kendricks paid Sonoiki in cash, as well as with Philadelphia Eagles tickets.

Kendricks, who is expected to plead guilty to the charges, released a statement admitting that he took part in illegal trading activity. He said he invested money with a friend he trusted and that he did not understand all of the details of his investment but “knew it was wrong.”

Kendricks said he takes full responsibility for his actions and has been cooperating with investigators. 

Kendricks, who played for the Eagles from 2012-2018, was cut by the team during the offseason. He was then picked up by the Cleveland Browns.

This is a developing story. Stay with FOX 29 for the latest.

M-4.4 earthquake strikes near La Verne

– A magnitude-4.4 earthquake struck north of La Verne Tuesday night, but no injuries or damage were immediately reported.

The earthquake struck at 7:33 p.m. 2.7 miles north of La Verne, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

The earthquake’s depth was 3.7 miles, the USGS reported.

It was felt at police headquarters in downtown Los Angeles and in Glendale, Lakewood, other parts of Los Angeles County and Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, Kern and San Diego counties.

A resident in Lakewood reported a “real sharp and fast” shaking.

The USGS reported that a second quake, with a magnitude of 3.4, struck near the same area about a minute after the first.

There were no immediate reports of damage in Los Angeles or La Verne, police in both cities said.

A Los Angeles County Fire Department dispatch supervisor said the department had received no reports of damage or injuries.

No damage or injuries were reported in Pasadena, police there said.

Police and fire departments dispatched personnel to check for damage.

Seismologist Lucy Jones said the quake should not be expected to have done damage to structures.

Jones said the quake, felt as far away as Bakersfield and Oceanside, was not on the Sierra Madre fault, one of the largest in the region, but on an ancillary structure.

The earthquake was the largest in Southern California since Dec. 29, 2015, when a magnitude-4.3 quake struck near Devore, in San Bernardino County, Jones said.

A 5.1-magnitude earthquake struck in La Habra on March 28, 2014.

“This is a very ordinary earthquake for California, the size that we have several times a year somewhere in the state,” Jones said.

More than a dozen small aftershocks were felt and as is always the case, there was about a 5 percent the largest magnitude-4.4 earthquake would be followed by a bigger one, Jones said.

Copyright 2018 FOX 11 Los Angeles: Download our mobile app for breaking news alerts or to watch FOX 11 News | Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.

Here's why Mayor Kenney and Superintendent Hite visited Blaine Elementary this morning: MEEK

How to do Made in America right: Download the app, drink water and don't be a dick

It’s Made in America time, Philadelphia.

The outdoor music fest curated by Jay-Z is taking over Ben Franklin Parkway for the sixth year in a row this Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 1-2. (And it’ll stay on the Parkway for the foreseeable future, because — after considerable drama — Mayor Kenney and HOVA are now besties.)

This year’s two-day entertainment spectacle is saying hello to new sponsors Abercrombie & Fitch and Puma and farewell to Budweiser. No need to cry over spilled beer, though. Jay’s fave D’USSÉ Cognac will be featured at 20 bars on the festival’s grounds, whipped up in nine different signature cocktails.

The star power that’ll perform at the foot of the Art Museum steps includes headliners Kendrick Lamar, Nicki Minaj and Post Malone, and a ton of other talent.

Once you’ve snagged your GA tickets ($175 covers both days), found the coolest red-white-and-blue gear, purchased all your pregame bottles of cheap booze and updated yourself on all of the road closures, you’re good to go, right?

Not so fast. We’re going to teach you how to do Made in America responsibly, advantageously, correctly and, well, right.

Follow this advice and you’ll be able to make it an experience full of✨ good vibes ✨ only.

IMG_0466
Mónica Marie Zorrilla/Billy Penn

There’s a handy-dandy app, available for Apple and Android smartphones. Once you download it, you can check out news updates, the layout of the festival, the weekend’s lineup and schedule, social feeds and the FAQ.

Yes, it’s actually useful. With the app, you’ll be able to personalize your experience by filtering out the artists you’re meh about and creating an agenda with dates, times and stages of performances that you’re ecstatic about. This important info can only be found on the app.

*But don’t forget to cancel your membership after the six-month free trial period if you aren’t thrilled with the service. Nothing sneaks up on you faster than a recurring auto-payment on your credit card.

The perks are worth the hassle though. Signing up with TIDAL means that you can enjoy artist meet & greets, access to the TIDAL lounge with seating, charging stations and A/C, a faster entry line into the festival, access to the VIP risers and contests for ticket upgrades and premium merch.

These mobile, 8” x 12” x 18” charging lockers are worth the $35 price tag because you can use the same locker for two days straight. It’s the little things.

Yeah, music festivals aren’t cheap. Bring cash — or budget enough — for overpriced food, drinks and swag. To avoid getting pickpocketed, rock a fanny pack or keep your wallets in the front pockets of your shorts (gentlemen: we’re looking at YOU).

Unlike the performance schedule, the MIA ’18 FAQ list can be found on the fest’s site and the app. One of the most important questions answered? What not to bring.

(We’d love to see someone attempt to sneak in a ladder…)

Made in America 3
Made in America

The Skate Stage will be near the exit at the corner of N. 22nd St. and Pennsylvania Ave., facing Cause Village and across from the TIDAL Stage.

Music festivals are marathons, not sprints. Don’t drink all of those D’USSÉ Painkillers and Watermelon Coolers at once in the morning and expect to feel anything but prepared to vomit on the entirety of the Parkway by the afternoon.

Tough mental image? Toughen up and resist the temptation to be a not-hot mess.

Hydrate with plenty of water in between cocktails. Lucky for you, there are free refill stations throughout festival grounds, and loads of corporate sponsors and nonprofit organizations excited to give you a free water bottle.

Oh, and speaking of not being gross… Hygiene. Let’s not go into the nitty-gritty details but, porta-potties used by thousands aren’t exactly in tip-top shape. Remember to bring packets of Kleenex to use as toilet paper and mini bottles of hand sanitizer, maybe even a travel-sized deodorant and toothbrush to spare the nostrils of your fellow concertgoers.

You’ll feel better throughout the day-long festivities if you’re clean.

Boozing, dancing and jumping around calls for calorie replenishment. Thanks to a culinary competition last month, some of the best local vendors will be out at the Parkway serving deliciousness during MIA.

These are: Authentik Byrek, Bassett Ice Cream, Ben & Jerry’s, Brotherly Grubb, Chewy’s, ChiWaffles, The Cow and The Curd, Dre’s Water Ice & Ice Cream, Dump N Roll, El Tlaloc, Epicurian, FMK, GiGi’s & Big R’s Soul Food, Grubaholics, Humpty’s Dumplings, Innovative Catering, King of Pops, Laughing Crab Catering, Lil Pop Shop, Lil Trent’s, The Little Sicilian, Mama’s Meatballs, Mi Pueblito Tacos, PaperMill, Skinny Buddha, The Snowball Experience, Soul Kantina, Tica’s Tacos and Trip’s Tasteful.

You’re bound to see people that stand nonstop — sometimes for seven or eight hours — to see the artists at the main stage. This is how they spend their whole MIA experience.

While that may be ideal for some, the point of a festival is to soak in all it has to offer and to immerse yourself entirely. More than food, drinks and jams, there’s also green space to lay down in, charities and nonprofit organizations to discover, picnic tables to chill and chat at and stages th
at are more intimate, less crowded and in some cases, way more fun that the headliners.

This is a weekend party where many college freshmen get absolutely trashed. Try to sympathize and help them not regret their first time out as a college student.

If you see someone struggling or in a situation that could become potentially dangerous, chat with security or suggest guiding the person (or persons) in question to one of the medical stations onsite.

And generally, please don’t:

  • Touch people without their consent
  • Catcall or wolf whistle
  • Smoke in people’s faces
  • Start drunken brawls
  • Push, shove or run
  • Puke in front of people eating by the food trucks
  • Be a dick

Enjoy Made in America and stay safe!

 

How to do Made in America right: Download the app, bring water and don't be a dick

It’s Made in America time, Philadelphia.

The outdoor music fest curated by Jay-Z is taking over Ben Franklin Parkway for the sixth year in a row this Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 1-2. (And it’ll stay on the Parkway for the foreseeable future, because — after considerable drama — Mayor Kenney and HOVA are now besties.)

This year’s two-day entertainment spectacle is saying hello to new sponsors Abercrombie & Fitch and Puma and farewell to Budweiser. No need to cry over spilled beer, though. Jay’s fave D’USSÉ Cognac will be featured at 20 bars on the festival’s grounds, whipped up in nine different signature cocktails.

The star power that’ll perform at the foot of the Art Museum steps includes headliners Kendrick Lamar, Nicki Minaj and Post Malone, and a ton of other talent.

Once you’ve snagged your GA tickets ($175 covers both days), found the coolest red-white-and-blue gear, purchased all your pregame bottles of cheap booze and updated yourself on all of the road closures, you’re good to go, right?

Not so fast. We’re going to teach you how to do Made in America responsibly, advantageously, correctly and, well, right.

Follow this advice and you’ll be able to make it an experience full of✨ good vibes ✨ only.

IMG_0466
Mónica Marie Zorrilla/Billy Penn

There’s a handy-dandy app, available for Apple and Android smartphones. Once you download it, you can check out news updates, the layout of the festival, the weekend’s lineup and schedule, social feeds and the FAQ.

Yes, it’s actually useful. With the app, you’ll be able to personalize your experience by filtering out the artists you’re meh about and creating an agenda with dates, times and stages of performances that you’re ecstatic about. This important info can only be found on the app.

*But don’t forget to cancel your membership after the six-month free trial period if you aren’t thrilled with the service. Nothing sneaks up on you faster than a recurring auto-payment on your credit card.

The perks are worth the hassle though. Signing up with TIDAL means that you can enjoy artist meet & greets, access to the TIDAL lounge with seating, charging stations and A/C, a faster entry line into the festival, access to the VIP risers and contests for ticket upgrades and premium merch.

These mobile, 8” x 12” x 18” charging lockers are worth the $35 price tag because you can use the same locker for two days straight. It’s the little things.

Yeah, music festivals aren’t cheap. Bring cash — or budget enough — for overpriced food, drinks and swag. To avoid getting pickpocketed, rock a fanny pack or keep your wallets in the front pockets of your shorts (gentlemen: we’re looking at YOU).

Unlike the performance schedule, the MIA ’18 FAQ list can be found on the fest’s site and the app. One of the most important questions answered? What not to bring.

(We’d love to see someone attempt to sneak in a ladder…)

Made in America 3
Made in America

The Skate Stage will be near the exit at the corner of N. 22nd St. and Pennsylvania Ave., facing Cause Village and across from the TIDAL Stage.

Music festivals are marathons, not sprints. Don’t drink all of those D’USSÉ Painkillers and Watermelon Coolers at once in the morning and expect to feel anything but prepared to vomit on the entirety of the Parkway by the afternoon.

Tough mental image? Toughen up and resist the temptation to be a not-hot mess.

Hydrate with plenty of water in between cocktails. Lucky for you, there are free refill stations throughout festival grounds, and loads of corporate sponsors and nonprofit organizations excited to give you a free water bottle.

Oh, and speaking of not being gross… Hygiene. Let’s not go into the nitty-gritty details but, porta-potties used by thousands aren’t exactly in tip-top shape. Remember to bring packets of Kleenex to use as toilet paper and mini bottles of hand sanitizer, maybe even a travel-sized deodorant and toothbrush to spare the nostrils of your fellow concertgoers.

You’ll feel better throughout the day-long festivities if you’re clean.

Boozing, dancing and jumping around calls for calorie replenishment. Thanks to a culinary competition last month, some of the best local vendors will be out at the Parkway serving deliciousness during MIA.

These are: Authentik Byrek, Bassett Ice Cream, Ben & Jerry’s, Brotherly Grubb, Chewy’s, ChiWaffles, The Cow and The Curd, Dre’s Water Ice & Ice Cream, Dump N Roll, El Tlaloc, Epicurian, FMK, GiGi’s & Big R’s Soul Food, Grubaholics, Humpty’s Dumplings, Innovative Catering, King of Pops, Laughing Crab Catering, Lil Pop Shop, Lil Trent’s, The Little Sicilian, Mama’s Meatballs, Mi Pueblito Tacos, PaperMill, Skinny Buddha, The Snowball Experience, Soul Kantina, Tica’s Tacos and Trip’s Tasteful.

You’re bound to see people that stand nonstop — sometimes for seven or eight hours — to see the artists at the main stage. This is how they spend their whole MIA experience.

While that may be ideal for some, the point of a festival is to soak in all it has to offer and to immerse yourself entirely. More than food, drinks and jams, there’s also green space to lay down in, charities and nonprofit organizations to discover, picnic tables to chill and chat at and stages th
at are more intimate, less crowded and in some cases, way more fun that the headliners.

This is a weekend party where many college freshmen get absolutely trashed. Try to sympathize and help them not regret their first time out as a college student.

If you see someone struggling or in a situation that could become potentially dangerous, chat with security or suggest guiding the person (or persons) in question to one of the medical stations onsite.

And generally, please don’t:

  • Touch people without their consent
  • Catcall or wolf whistle
  • Smoke in people’s faces
  • Start drunken brawls
  • Push, shove or run
  • Puke in front of people eating by the food trucks
  • Be a dick

Enjoy Made in America and stay safe!

 

Aldi signed on for the ground floor of the planned apartment complex at Broad and Fairmount

Aldi also has opened or is in the process of opening what it calls “mixed-use development” stores in Chicago, Minneapolis, and the Washington, D.C., area, Bob Grammer, vice president for the Aldi division that covers eastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey and northern Delaware, said in an email.

Stolen paint truck crashes, drenching suspect

LANCASTER, Pa. (AP) — Police say man driving a stolen truck carrying a load of white paint crashed into a number of cars and flipped the vehicle, spilling the buckets all over the road and the suspect, covered head-to-toe in paint, fled but returned as police arrived.

Police in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, say the man shoved an officer, and as they tried to handcuff him, he was so slippery that he got out of the cuffs and attempted to flee again. He was caught and secured, but officers were also covered in paint as a result of the struggle.

The truck was reported stolen from Delaware. The 29-year-old driver, Roberto Ramirez of Wilmington, Delaware, was charged Tuesday after being treated at a hospital overnight.

No attorney information is available for Ramirez.