CDC: Blood-sucking ‘kissing bug’ confirmed in Delaware; Pennsylvania may be next

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has confirmed that a bug with a bite that can lead to serious cardiac and gastrointestinal complications, or even death if the person bitten goes without treatment, has been found in Delaware.

A family in Kent County reported to state health and agriculture officials that an odd insect bit their child’s face in July 2018. The bug was then sent off to the CDC, where it was identified as Triatoma sanguisuga, also known as the “kissing bug.”

It’s known as the kissing bug because it usually bites humans on exposed skin, like the face.

The kissing bug can carry a parasite that can infect a person or animal’s blood with Chagas disease, which presents itself in two phases. The initial acute phase, according to the World Health Organization, involves more mild symptoms, like fever, fatigue, rash, muscle pain, and vomiting. The chronic phase can lead to more serious conditions, like swollen liver, glands or eyelids, or even enlarged heart, esophagus or colon.

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Fortunately, the Delaware girl who was bitten by the blood-sucking bug did not get sick in any way. 

While Chagas disease is common in Latin America and still relatively rare in the U.S., the CDC said kissing bugs have now been found in about 30 states, including Pennsylvania. 

The insects have also been found along the border of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, meaning they may be crossing into the Garden State. 

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Radnor High School to open an hour later next year

RADNOR TWP., Pa.  (KYW Newsradio) — The Radnor Township School Board just approved a plan to push back the start time at Radnor High School. The changes will go into effect in the 2019-2020 school year, when the day will start at 8:30 a.m.

This new start time is 55 minutes later than the current start time of 7:35 a.m. The school board’s decision follows years of research that included the district surveying students, parents, community members and experts about sleep habits. 

The school district, citing several organizations, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, the CDC, and the American Medical Association, says the 8:30 a.m. start time would prevent sleep deprivation among students. They say that would lead to a drop in sleepiness in class, disciplinary issues, car crashes involving students, and even sports injuries. 

Related: Hit snooze? Radnor board to vote on later high school start time

The other schools in the district would face changes as well, but they aren’t as dramatic. The middle school would begin the day 10 minutes earlier, while the three elementary schools would start seven minutes later than they do now. The changes are only minor, officials say, so that the bus schedules would work for all the schools. Elementary school parents also expressed concern about starting too early.

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Solarize Philly launches 3rd year of leveraging group buying power to make solar energy affordable

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — If you live in Philadelphia and you’ve been thinking about getting solar panels on your house, this should be the year you do it. 

That’s the message from the Philadelphia Energy Authority as it launches the third year of its Solarize Philly program, with 2019 being the last year for the full tax credit on going solar. 

Leslie Gaines got estimates for solarizing her house of around $25,000, but when she called Solarize Philly, the price came down to $12,000 and she became one of the 360 homeowners who’ve taken advantage of the program’s group buying power to go solar.

“I’ve been wanting to do this for over ten years and doing it mostly for future generations, for my son. I’m a mom and I really feel like we all need to do something to safeguard their future,” she said. 

The more people who sign up for solar through Solarize Philly, the deeper the discounts. Customers are also eligible for a federal tax credit. 

But program manager Laura Rigell says that’s being phased downward after 2019. 

“This is your last chance to cut the cost of solar by 30 percent,” Rigell said. 

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That’s in addition to the savings of buying through the program, which Victor Young says is substantial.

“It was like maybe a $13,000 difference in what Solarize Philadelphia offered than what this company out in New Jersey offered me,” Young said. 

And now, Young has no more utility bills. 

Customers like Young are mostly motivated by wanting to reduce carbon emissions. The savings make it possible and the program has a financing plan so that at least 20 percent of customers are low- and moderate-income.

Rigell says the program’s main goal is to reduce carbon emissions but it has the side benefit of creating jobs.

“Rooftop solar generates the most jobs per dollar invested of any type of energy project,” Rigell explained.

She says the program created 52 jobs just last year.

For more information, click here. 

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Philadelphia Fraternal Order of Police take stand against DA following controversial decision

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — Police and victims of violent crimes protest against Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner for what they are calling a miscarriage of justice.

Krasner’s decision not to appeal a ruling gives way for Mumia Abu-Jamal to get his case before the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. 

Jamal is currently on death row for the 1981 murder of Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner.

“I want him behind bars,” said Faulkner’s widow, Maureen.  

Maureen stood along side dozens of other protesters and politicians Tuesday at the Philadelphia Fraternal Order of Police Headquarters speaking out against Krasner and his decision.

“He lied to me. He deceived me, and I don’t think it was fair for him to do that,” she said. 

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Maureen believes Krasner does not care about her family.

FOP president John McNesby, who’s been a strong opponent of Krasner, helped organize the rally on Maureen’s behalf.

“We’re going to be shopping for a new district attorney in a couple of years. We have to somebody in that office that’s a chief law enforcement officer, not a chief public defender,” McNesby said. 

Many Abu-Jamal supporters say his case is plagued with judicial and police misconduct and he should be freed, not just receive a new trail.

Calls and messages to Krasner’s office were not immediately returned.

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Former Philadelphia Sheriff John Green signs surprise plea arrangement

In a surprise plea arrangement, less than a week before former Philadelphia Sheriff John Green's retrial in an alleged bribery and kickback scheme, he pleaded guilty.

Steve Tawa/KYW Newsradio

Former Philly Sheriff John Green signs surprise plea arrangement

April 23, 2019
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PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — Less than a week before his corruption re-trial was to start, there was a hastily called proceeding for former Philadelphia Sheriff John Green, during which he pleaded guilty to “conspiracy to commit honest services fraud.”

The plea arrangement came together at the last moment, so much so that his defense lawyer, Peter Scuderi, was excused for appearing in court wearing a casual grey pullover sport jersey, chinos and boat shoes.

“The offer the government made was a fair resolution,” Scuderi said. 

During Green’s first trial in 2018, jurors acquitted him of three of the charges; they were deadlocked, and could not decide the other two.

“It was not a clear case for the government. And I think that was reflected in the verdict, the first time around,” Scuderi added. 

“He sold his office for an enormous stream of undisclosed and illegal benefits,” U.S. Attorney Bill McSwain said. 

At the same six-week long trial, his co-defendant, businessman James Davis, was found guilty of conspiracy and fraud. The jury also acquitted Davis on two counts and deadlocked on another count. 

Davis was sentenced to 10 years in prison.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Christopher Diviniy went through the basic facts in the case, detailing how Green diverted public contracts to companies owned by Davis, who returned the favor with what he called a “complex bribery and kickback scheme.”

For a moment, when Judge Wendy Beetlestone asked Green “is that what happened?,” Scuderi responded “there are facts that support a guilty plea.” Judge Beetlestone shot back, “that’s not good enough. I need your client to say he did what the government described. I don’t think I can proceed otherwise.” 

Green then responded “Yes, your honor, I am guilty. I have betrayed the confidence that the citizens of Philadelphia had in me.”

Beetlestone will sentence Green Aug. 1. He faces a maximum of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

___

CORRECTION: In a previous version of this story, some quotations from defense lawyer Peter Scuderi were attributed to U.S. Attorney Bill McSwain.

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Campus community steps in to try to save beloved Penn Book Center from closing

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — As brick-and-mortar stores struggle to compete with online sales across the country, supporters from the University of Pennsylvania community have gathered to stop a local bookstore from closing its doors for good. 

Ashley Montague, co-owner of Penn Book Center at 34th and Sansom streets, said the trouble began a couple of years ago with textbooks.

“We would always check the Amazon prices to try to say, ‘OK well this is what they’re selling it for, we might lower our price to try to get close to their price,'” she said. “But when they’re selling the book for what we’re paying for it, obviously that is a price we cannot match.”

As a result, Montague said they stopped selling textbooks because they could no longer afford that business model. 

“We expanded our hours, we changed the layout of the store, increased the number of events that we had in the store to the point where now I think we have over 100 a year,” she added, but that wasn’t enough. 

The owners announced the store would close after more than 50 years in the business. 

But that’s when Penn professor Chi-ming Yang stepped in. She started a petition urging the university to help save the store. It now has more than 4,000 signatures and a response from the provost’s office. 

Additional rallies this week are a display of community support for a business that gives back to the community, which Yang said sets Penn Book Center apart from Amazon and chain retailers.

“It’s very rare to find a space where you can have interaction across different age groups and between faculty and students and community members,” she said, “both through the kind of books they sell there, but also the amazing author events they hold at the store.”

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US marshals arrest man for 2018 fatal stabbing in Chinatown

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — A man wanted for the fatal stabbing of a Cherry Hill man Chinatown in October 2018 has been arrested Tuesday in Southwest Philadelphia by federal marshals and homicide detectives.

Police officers said they received information that 26-year-old Victor Yan was hiding in a home on Woodland Avenue near South 67th Street.

When marshals from the Fugitive Task Force and police went into the home around 6:15 a.m., Yan ran upstairs and climbed onto the roof.

After a brief standoff, he eventually gave up and was taken away to face homicide and related charges.

Police say Yan stabbed 28-year-old Brett Berdini at 10th and Race streets on Oct. 16, 2018 after he and his girlfriend left a nearby bar.

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Artistic layers of paint discovered in Al Capone’s cell during preservation efforts at Eastern State Penitentiary

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — When the walls of Al Capone’s cell were being prepared to be plastered in the beginning of the year, 20 layers of paint were uncovered, revealing another fold in the gangster’s history.

During the restorative work at Eastern State Penitentiary, Liz Trumbull, manager of historic preservation and architectural conservation, said the paint layers were unusual.

“They were colorful, they were decorative — there was evidence of artistic painting in this cell,” she said, “so we decided to pause our work and really study what we were finding.”

Officials discovered that the traces of paint were most likely used for faux wood finishings.

“We were most interested in these really thin, traditionally made paints that you can see under the microscope. From those, we found evidence of two different decorative campaigns,” she explained. “We hadn’t looked closely at it until now. There’s no archival record of institutional paint campaigns, and this cell in particular is one of the most intact examples that we have of artistic painting at Eastern State.”

Trumbull said a vertical brown stripe on the rear wall of the cell may have been part of a mural. The cell with the artistic paint discoveries will not be disturbed. 

The new Capone exhibit will showcase a recreation of how his cell likely appeared during his incarceration, but in a cell neighboring the artistic findings. 
 
After about four months of preservation efforts, the newly restored cell reopens to the public May 2. It will still feature lavish furnishings, but a second bed will be added — after all these years, it was recently learned through an old newspaper article that Capone had a cellmate.

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Father and son hospitalized as police search for burglars who shot them

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — A father and son are recovering from gunshot wounds, and police are trying to find the burglars who shot them.

A family of four came home around 9:45 Monday night on Marlowe Street, between Bridge and Pratt Streets in Frankford, in Frankford. 

Investigators say they encountered two people who had broken in while they were out at Home Depot. 

“Males inside the house fired at least 10 times, striking the father — both arms and his torso,” Captain John Walker said. “They also hit the 12-year-old-son in the chest. He was grazed.”

Police took both to the hospital. The father is in critical condition but is expected to survive. The boy is stable.

The burglars got away off in a gold-colored minivan.

Police took the victims to the hospital. Both father and son are expected to recover. 

“It kinda just shows, these guns on the street and how they become problematic,” Walker said. “Especially here in a burglary case. Usually burglars don’t carry guns but in this situation they did.”

Walker says there have been a few other burglaries in the area in recent weeks, and police are trying to figure out if there is a connection.

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Villanova University students focus cameras on changing healthcare for women in Ethiopia

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — This week brings the premiere of a short film Villanova University students have been working on since September. It took them to the Horn of Africa, where they found desperate conditions for expectant moms in need of health care.

“They only have one operating room, one overhead light for the table, one ambulance that’s supposed to cover 100,000 people,” said senior Sarah Davis, who spent two weeks in Ethiopia with her crew as part of a social justice documentary class. 

“We’re looking at the obstacles to safe surgery and the access that’s lacking, especially for women in rural Ethiopia,” she said.

Distance to care can be an obstacle. But so can cost and the culture. 

“The man makes most of the decisions in the house. If he doesn’t want the woman to go to a hospital, then she’s not allowed to go. Because traditionally, it’s been seen as the place where one goes to die,” Davis explained. 

Their 20-minute film is called “Carrying Tomorrow.” Its tag line: where a woman lives should not determine if she lives.

“They just wanted to share their story. They wanted to let more women know about the hospitals, and the hope that more people can see this,” Davis added. 

It premieres Friday at 2300 Arena in South Philadelphia. Tickets are available here. 

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There might be ways to make CPAP more comfortable for you

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — Millions of people have obstructive sleep apnea and are told to wear a nighttime device to keep them breathing. However, the CPAP is not always a pleasant fix.

Only about half of the people who need a CPAP are successful wearing the device, says Dr. Maria Vega, a sleep physician at Temple University Hospital. She says a lot of people find wearing the mask just too uncomfortable. But she says there are several styles, so if one doesn’t work try a different kind. 

Others complain of feeling closed in.

“I usually tell my patients to try to use the CPAP or the mask during the day and not that they need it because they don’t have pauses when they’re awake. But it helps them get used the mask, so when the night comes, they’re more used to the CPAP and the mask and they can feel less claustrophobic,” Vega said. 

It can cause a dry or stuffy nose, which can be relieved by using nasal saline spray at bedtime or turning on the machine’s humidifier. Skin irritation can be helped by lotion, a mask liner or loosening the straps so it’s not so tight. 

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Two peopled killed in chain reaction crash identified

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — The two people killed in a chain reaction crash Saturday night in the Northeast section of the city have been identified and police are still looking for the driver who caused the crash.

The crash happened Saturday night on Bustleton Avenue near Red Lion Road. Police say the driver of a Chevy Camaro hit two vehicles that triggered a chain reaction. 

A man and woman inside a flipped car died at the scene. 

They have been identified as 48-year-old Carmen Montalvo Ruiz and 50-year-old Juan Lopez Rivera. 

Five other people were rushed to the hospital. 

Police are also searching for a person driving a white Lexus, who they say helped the driver leave the scene. 

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Wildwood mayor: Kate Smith’s ‘God Bless America’ will continue to play on boardwalk

WILDWOOD, NJ (KYW Newsradio) — Her statue was torn down at the sports complex. The Flyers won’t play her rendition of ‘God Bless America.’

However, there is one public place you’ll still be able to hear Kate Smith perform that song: on the boardwalk in Wildwood every morning.

Mayor Ernie Troiano Jr. was on Dom Giordano’s show on our sister station Talk Radio 1210 WPHT.

“We understand history. But the world has gotten so politically correct, and so afraid that they’re going to offend somebody,” he said. “Well, you know what — the song is greater than anything, so it’ll continue to play in Wildwood.”

Related:

The mayor says it’s a matter of learning from your mistakes and moving forward — a reference to the controversy over the racist lyrics used by the late singer in the 1930s.

The daily playing of Smith’s ‘God Bless America,’ along with the national anthem, has long been a summertime tradition in Wildwood.

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Employees from media company Entercom celebrate Earth Day by getting to work in Philadelphia parks

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — The portion of Fairmount Park near Lemon Hill got a facelift Monday thanks to 150 Entercom employees who volunteered their afternoon in celebration of Earth Day.

Entercom is the radio company that owns KYW Newsradio and 234 other stations nationwide. 

Volunteers raked, bagged, mulched, planted, picked up trash, pulled up weeds and spruced up the space all around Lemon Hill.

To celebrate Earth Day, Jaimie Field, the company’s director of sustainability, says Entercom partnered with Fairmount Park Conservancy to help spruce up the Lemon Hill Project near boathouse row.

While the local park will feel the impact, the effort is much broader.

“In almost 50 markets across America, almost 3,000 people, they are all making a difference in their community,” said Jaimie, referring to Entercom locations nationwide.

“We’re just so thrilled to have them out because it takes a lot of man power,” said Meg Holsher, who works at the Fairmount Park Conservancy.  

She says the nonprofit provides the materials and training, and corporate partners like Entercom provide the workers. And the help is game-changing, week to week.

“This is an area heavily trafficked by families, so we like to keep it clean,” said Holsher, “we would love to have them here working every week!”

“We’re a company that has a deep sense of responsibility and we give back every year,” said David Field, CEO of Entercom. 

He spent the afternoon planting trees and says the clean up effort is part of Entercom’s 1 Thing sustainability initiative.

“It really is a part of our values as a company,” he said. “It’s an honor and privilege to be broadcasters, so we are out here in force trying to make Philadelphia an even greater place.”

As part of the company’s 1 Thing initiative, employees use less paper at the workplace, employ reusable water bottles and dishes and much more as part of Entercom’s pledge to act as an environmentally responsible corporate citizen. 

For more details on the 1 Thing initiative at Entercom, click here. 

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Employees from radio company Entercom celebrate Earth Day by getting to work in Philadelphia parks

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — The portion of Fairmount Park near Lemon Hill got a facelift Monday thanks to 150 Entercom employees who volunteered their afternoon in celebration of Earth Day.

Entercom is the radio company that owns KYW Newsradio and 234 other stations nationwide. 

Volunteers raked, bagged, mulched, planted, picked up trash, pulled up weeds and spruced up the space all around Lemon Hill.

To celebrate Earth Day, Jaimie Field, the company’s director of sustainability, says Entercom partnered with Fairmount Park Conservancy to help spruce up the Lemon Hill Project near boathouse row.

While the local park will feel the impact, the effort is much broader.

“In almost 50 markets across America, almost 3,000 people, they are all making a difference in their community,” said Jaimie, referring to Entercom locations nationwide.

“We’re just so thrilled to have them out because it takes a lot of man power,” said Meg Holsher, who works at the Fairmount Park Conservancy.  

She says the nonprofit provides the materials and training, and corporate partners like Entercom provide the workers. And the help is game-changing, week to week.

“This is an area heavily trafficked by families, so we like to keep it clean,” said Holsher, “we would love to have them here working every week!”

“We’re a company that has a deep sense of responsibility and we give back every year,” said David Field, CEO of Entercom. 

He spent the afternoon planting trees and says the clean up effort is part of Entercom’s 1 Thing sustainability initiative.

“It really is a part of our values as a company,” he said. “It’s an honor and privilege to be broadcasters, so we are out here in force trying to make Philadelphia an even greater place.”

As part of the company’s 1 Thing initiative, employees use less paper at the workplace, employ reusable water bottles and dishes and much more as part of Entercom’s pledge to act as an environmentally responsible corporate citizen. 

For more details on the 1 Thing initiative at Entercom, click here. 

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Temple University unveils plan to combat climate change

Temple University campus.

Kristen Johanson/KYW Newsradio, File

Temple unveils plan to combat climate change

April 22, 2019
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PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — Temple University used Earth Day to unveil its 30-year plan to combat climate change as the school aims to be carbon-neutral by 2050.

“We’re trying to create a healthy community for future generations,” said Temple sustainability director Kathleen Grady. 

With self-imposed consequences for not hitting greenhouse gas reduction targets every year, Grady adds. 

“If we don’t meet them, Temple is on the hook to buy renewable energy credits to make sure that we meet those goals,” she said. 

Campus buildings are the school’s biggest emissions offender, so the plan seeks energy efficiency improvements and alternatives to traditional power sources. 

“Temple will commit to a long-term purchase of at least 50 percent of its electricity coming from a renewable source,” Grady explained. 

They’ll also study the impact of getting 45,000 people to and from Temple every day. 

Grady says students are the generation most motivated to do something about the environment, and they helped design the school’s climate action plan. 

“The science is clear. Now is the time, because we’ve put it off for too long,” she added. 

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Mariner East 1 pipeline goes back into service

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — The Mariner East 1 pipeline is going back into service Monday afternoon.

The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission received notice last Friday that Energy Transfer Partners, Sunoco’s parent company, will restart ME1.

Sunoco is required to take additional steps to address safety concerns surrounding the project, especially along Lisa Drive in West Whiteland Township, Chester County.

Related:

ME1 has been out of service since Jan. 20 while engineers from the PUC’s Bureau of Investigation and Enforcement checked for stabilization. Sinkholes had developed along Lisa Drive, exposing the pipeline below. The project also caused water contamination and other issues. 

Energy Transfer will be required to walk the section of ME 1 on Lisa Drive every day until grouting of the line is complete. The company is also required to perform geophysical tests, conduct remote monitoring of the line along Lisa Drive and report the findings to the PUC.

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Lawsuit claims Valley Forge Military Academy enabled ‘culture of abuse’

WAYNE, Pa. (KYW Newsradio) — A lawsuit has been filed against Valley Forge Military Academy alleging the prep school in Radnor Township “enabled a culture of abuse” among its students.

The lawsuit, filed in Philadelphia, claims Valley Forge Military Academy did not take steps to protect a student after numerous complaints of abuse, and it says the school never reported that abuse.

The suit seeks damages in excess in of $50,000 but attorney Stew Ryan says this is not about the money for his client.

“From his perspective he wants to protect other students that are there now that have been there in the past or that may be there in the future should Valley Forge continue on in its existence from suffering the same fate that he has.”

The student’s name is not used in the complaint; instead, he is listed as John Doe.

But it lists many allegations of abuse at the hands of other students, including, the complaint says, boys beating him with a lacrosse stick, then forcing his mouth open and shoving the stick into his mouth, tying up his hands and feet and beating him with belts, then hanging him from a doorway by those restraints.

In March, 2017, juvenile charges were filed against three boys who conceded to the assaults and were dealt with through the juvenile justice system.

The suit says Valley Forge Military Academy did not have proper procedures in place to protect students. It also claims administrators knew, or should have known kids were being abused, but that abuse was allowed to continue by the culture and environment created and allowed by the staff.

Ryan says if any other former or current students suffered abuse at VFMA, they should contact his firm, Laffey Bucci and Kent.

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Court rules all agencies, including Catholic Social Services, must abide by city’s non-discrimination law

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — The Third Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that Philadelphia is within its right to require contractors — including Catholic Social Services, or CSS, an arm of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia — to abide by its non-discrimination policies. 

The ruling upholds the city’s decision to stop placing children in foster care through CSS, after learning that CSS would not certify same-sex couples as foster parents. 

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia filed a lawsuit in May 2018 in response to the city’s decision, claiming the city’s action violated religious freedom protections.

Related:

The court ultimately agreed with the city, noting CSS’ stance violates the city’s non-discrimination ordinance and it is not a violation of religious liberty, as CSS argued in its request for an injunction.

In a 50-page opinion, the three-judge panel rejected the contention that the city acted out of hostility toward Catholicism or tried to force CSS to act against its religious beliefs. It also holds that the city has an legitimate interest in making sure its services are open to all Philadelphians.

In an emailed statement, Mayor Jim Kenney said he’s grateful to the court for its analysis and pleased it upheld both religious liberty and non-discrimination toward same-sex couples. 

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia is closed for the Easter holiday, and its attorney at the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty law practice could not be reached for comment.

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Good Samaritans save woman’s life after her SUV plunges into Schuylkill River

PHILADELPHIA (KYW Newsradio) — One of three Good Samaritans, who helped rescue a woman whose SUV ran off Kelly Drive and into the Schuylkill River, says they managed to pull her out seconds before it sank.

Joseph Wentzell, who lives in the Wissahickon section, says he was driving home Sunday afternoon about 4 p.m. along Kelly Drive near Midvale Avenue when he noticed the commotion by the river.

Wentzell says he and his son pulled over and got out of the car and spotted the SUV floating in the river.

When he saw a woman trapped inside, Wentzell says, he knew he had to act. He took off his shoes, handed his wallet and cell phone to his son, and jumped into the river and swam to the SUV.

“I couldn’t climb on the back of the car and I was fearful of putting my weight on it and adding anything to put it under water faster,” he explained. “So, I went to the side and tried to break the window, and I couldn’t.”

Wentzell says two other men on shore saw what was happening and jumped in. He says one guy was holding a tire iron.

“I was able to get under him and hoist him up onto the back and he was able to break the back window with the tire iron,” he said.

He says they reached in and pulled the woman out seconds before the car went under.

Wentzell says a dragon boat team rowed up to them and brought the woman into the boat and also helped the rescuers.

“The boat stayed and we were all able to grab a hold of the side of the boat and they paddled us over to a dock that was nearby,” he said.

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